Misled Youths Giving Spiritualism Bad Name

Misled Youths Giving Spiritualism Bad Name - Zion Society
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“Stolen ‘guard rings’ behind school boy’s murder”.  “Tread carefully with guard rings”. “Bloodshed over guard rings”…..are just a few of the headline stories covered in our local newspapers recently, as a report revealed that a number of students from a prominent High School had turned to guard rings for protection,  an occult practice to the dismay and disappointment of many individuals, even a local Pastor.  This has left questions on the lips of most persons, such as:-

  1. “What is happening in our schools?”.  “
  2. “What has given rise to the growing incidents of satanic/occult practices in our schools?”

It is said that , “the wearing of guard rings dates back to the 1990’s and is therefore not new in schools and that the practice has gained prevalence as parents subject their children to spiritual baths and blessings by the practices of Obeah and Spiritism”.

It is believed that guard rings hold supernatural power, providing protection from harm, sickness and even death.

Obeah and Spiritism – The Origin

“It is said that Obeah and Spiritism originated in Africa and were introduced to the Caribbean in the mid 17th. Century.  It is said that Obeah and Spiritism were practiced by slaves who sought to connect with the spirit of their ancestors to protect them from the evil of the slave masters’ whips and bondage.

Regardless of the use – for evil or good, the Obeah men and women were treated with the utmost respect and fear by all whom met them.  Obeah practitioners played a prominent role in the Caribbean slave societies from the beginning of the slave trade.  They functioned as community leaders and teachers of the African folk’s cultural heritage.” (Loop News)

Jamaica – Obeah and Spiritism and our Culture

Obeah and Spiritism have been a part of the Jamaican culture for years, and many children have witnessed their parents or even relatives visiting drug stores to purchase oils, candles, powder and other ritualistic materials in the practice of Spiritism for protection.  Children have even witnessed parents and family members visit Obeah men and women and other Spiritual Practitioners for baths and other form of protection.

Should the attention be now placed on the “resocialisation of the nation’s children”?

Is there need for social or divine intervention?

Does Spiritism have a role to play in the “resocialisation of the nation’s children?”.

“MISLED YOUTH GIVING SPIRITUALISM BAD NAME”

Spiritualism can be a useful tool in helping individuals in living more meaningful life. It is said to have helped resolve marital issues, employment issues, health issues, or even financial issues.

However,  many youths have misused this information to their detriment and also the detriment of others; which has resulted in them “giving spiritualism a bad name”.

It has been said that tattoos could transform a  person both spiritually and psychologically.  Ceremonial tattooing has been said to have been arranged around phases of the moon which can coincide with Wiccan or Native American rituals.  Many artists have integrated spiritual practices into their artwork.   There are Spiritualists who have turned to tattooing to embrace their empowerment, believing tattoos hold a talismanic potential. Each design placed upon the skin has a specific meaning, even down to the physical placement of the art.

Many youths have had certain tattoos engraved on their bodies, not realizing that tattoos are a form of communication and that some of these tattoos have spiritual meanings that could attract demons or forces from the spiritual world which can influence them to carry out demonic acts – murder or even suicide.

World-Renowned Spiritualist, Professor Aba shares his views on the subject and provides advice/information/guidance to persons who seek empowerment with the help of spiritualism in their quest to live a more meaningful life.

Professor Aba can be reached for spiritual guidance at 1-876-313-8777

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